2 FILMS FOR 1 ADMISSION

Previously Played

  • WRITTEN ON THE WIND 3:10 7:20
  • MAGNIFICENT OBSESSION 1:00 5:10

Tickets available at box office only

Part of the seriesUNIVERSAL 100

See the complete schedule of films

WRITTEN ON THE WIND & MAGNIFICENT OBSESSION

WRITTEN ON THE WIND

(1956, Douglas Sirk) Psycho Robert Stack and trampy sister Dorothy Malone (in Oscar-winning role) discover it’s tough being heirs to a Texas oil fortune, but respectively find solace — or do they? — in bride Lauren Bacall and indifferent family friend Rock Hudson. Approx. 99 min. 35mm.
3:10, 7:20

 

“Sirk plays it as a conspicuously fierce critique of a particular sector of American society, the disintegrating middle class, but one in which all the sympathy goes to the 'lost' children rather than to the straights. The acting is dynamite, the melodrama is compulsive, the photography, lighting, and design share a bold disregard for realism. It's not an old movie; it's a film for the future.”
Time Out (London)

“A perverse and wickedly funny melodrama... In countless ways visible and invisible, Sirk's sly subversion skewed American popular culture, and helped launch a new age of irony.”
– Roger Ebert

WRITTEN ON THE WIND & MAGNIFICENT OBSESSION

MAGNIFICENT OBSESSION

(Sirk version)

(1954, Douglas Sirk) Speed-crazed playboy Rock Hudson widows and blinds Jane Wyman, then becomes a dedicated eye surgeon whose “magnificent obsession” leads him to restore both her sight and life. Approx. 108 min 35mm.
1:00, 5:10

 

"Fate, irony, faith, altruism, martinis, speedboats, instantaneous blindness, exotic European clinics, secular Christianity, charitable sexuality, and modernist interior design are all ladled onto moralist/novelist Lloyd C. Douglas's rickety narrative frame without so much as the whisper of a suspicion that the whole enterprise ought to collapse even without the added weight of Sirk's soon-to-be trademark Brechtian skepticism. In short, Magnificent Obsession is perhaps the first Sirk film to call to mind Stuart Klawans's memorable description of 'film follies': 'These are movies for people who want to die from too much cinema.'"
– Eric Henderson, Slant Magazine

"An extraordinary film about vision: sight, destiny, blindness (literal and figurative), colour and light; the convoluted, rather absurd actions (a magnificent repression?) tellingly counterpointed by the clean compositions and the straight lines and space of modern architecture."
Time Out (London)