Previously Played

THE MAN WHO FELL TO EARTH

  • 9:15 ONLY

$7 Member   $12.50 Regular

Part of the seriesSUMMER FESTIVAL OF FANTASY, HORROR & SCIENCE FICTION

See the complete schedule of films

THE MAN WHO FELL TO EARTH

(1976, Nicholas Roeg) "Are you Lithuanian?" After a space craft seemingly crashes to Earth, David Bowie walks off, then almost immediately hires high-priced, thick-spectacled patent attorney (Graduate screenwriter Buck Henry) to register ten world-changing patents. Orange-haired, pale-faced, minimally expressioned Bowie (well-cast as an alien in his first starring role) desperately yearns to return himself and water to his parched planet - but will the authorities let him? - with coed-shtupping professor Rip Torn providing technical help, and chambermaid Candy Clark providing distractions via overdoses of very terrestrial booze, church, sex, and television. Approx. 139 min. 35mm.

REVIEWS

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"THE MOST INTELLECTUALLY PROVOCATIVE GENRE FILM OF THE 1970s!"
– Time Out New York

"A SINGULAR, HAUNTING SCI-FI EXPERIENCE! Like Roeg's Walkabout, Man Who Fell to Earth 
is an exploration of an individual's grappling with an unfamiliar and unfriendly landscape, 
but whereas in Walkabout the landscape is the Australian outback, here it's the entirety of Earth."

 – Matt Noller, Slant Magazine



"ABSORBING AND BEAUTIFUL! Mr. Roeg has chosen the garish, translucent, androgynous-mannered rock-star, 
David Bowie, for his space visitor. The choice is inspired. Mr. Bowie gives an extraordinary performance. 
The details, the chemistry of this tall pale figure with black-rimmed eyes are clearly not human. 
Yet he acquires a moving, tragic force as the stranger caught and destroyed in a strange land."

 – Richard Eder, The New York Times



“Released the year before Close Encounters of the Third Kind and Star Wars, a science fiction film without science, a terrestrial space opera minus matte shots, models, or pyrotechnics that leaves us not wondering at the stars but grieving for ourselves. Roeg delights here in ‘taking away the crutch of time’ (it has puzzled people whether 25 minutes or 25 years have passed in the film), eliminating transitions, cross-cutting, flashing forward and back, piling dissolve upon dissolve, letting the camera jerk and twirl and zoom —
finding new ways to see familiar things, while speculating on what the world might look like to someone from Out There.”

– Robert Lloyd