Previously Played

THE GOLD RUSH

  • 11:00 AM

All Tickets $7.50

Part of the seriesFILM FORUM Jr.

See the complete schedule of films

Plus A Dog's Life (1918).

(1925) In search of gold in turn-of-the-century Alaska, Charlie takes refuge with fellow prospector Mack Swain in an isolated cabin, where hunger forces him to eat that famous shoe. The masterpiece that features more great Chaplin moments than any other: the dance of the rolls, the cabin tottering over the cliff, the giant chicken, etc. etc. Approx. 104 min. 35mm.

THE GOLD RUSH

REVIEWS

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***![five stars icon]!
[highest rating]
"THE GREATEST OF SILENT COMEDIES!"

– Keith Uhlich, Time Out New York

"A REMARKABLY POIGNANT, TOUCHING, AND (OF COURSE) HILARIOUS WORK OF ART! One of the purest expressions of the Tramp persona, it also features a couple of the actor-director's most legendary set-pieces."
– New York magazine

“ONE OF THE CINEMA’S GREAT COMEDIES!”
– David Robinson

“UNMISSABLE! QUINTESSENTIAL CHARLIE!”
– Dave Kehr

"Whether staving off hunger by cooking his boot or doing a dainty dance with a pair of dinner rolls, Chaplin confronts the moral implications of every delicious, meticulously realized gag. As the poor man of refinement, the overlooked wanderer despairing of romance, the survivalist imp of defiant pride, Chaplin is the apotheosis of the world's despised and downtrodden, and also their hope."
– Richard Brody, The New Yorker

“AN EXTRAORDINARLY SWEET AND GRACEFUL COMEDY!”
– Pauline Kael

“Its laughs, drawn out of tragedy, have a magnified force and meaning. Its principal character symbolizes the good, kind, and pitiful core of humanity. Moments reach the sublime.”
– Theodore Huff

“Proved to doubters that a great comedy could also be a great film... Chaplin alternated major comedy set pieces with moments of delicate and unforgettable pantomime.”
– Leonard Maltin

“One of Chaplin’s most complete works, the one that shows most clearly the tragic greatness of Charlie… The characters have richness, scope, and real meaning… Tragedy is no longer placed beside comedy. It is incorporated into it, it becomes part of it, so that the funniest scenes are also the ones in which there is the most interior tragedy. Hence the impression of greatness with which the film leaves on, comparable to that of a classical tragedy, a fresco that takes places on a higher plane than we are normally able to reach.”
– Pierre Leprohon

“Has some of Chaplin’s most ambitious – and most successful – scenes. The Gold Rush represents the height of his achievement. He could scarcely do better than the opening.”
– Edmund Wilson, The New Republic