Final Day! Tues, December 31

REMEMBER THE NIGHT

  • 1:30
  • 3:20
  • 5:10
  • 9:00

$7.00 Member   $12.50 Regular

Directed by MITCHELL LEISEN

Starring  Barbara Stanwyck & Fred MacMurray

Screenplay by Preston Sturges


*Sunday’s 5:20 show introduced by Stanwyck biographer Victoria Wilson

** Special NEW YEAR’S EVE Screening - free bubbly to 9:00 ticketholders on December 31!

REMEMBER THE NIGHT

(1940) Assistant New York D.A. Fred MacMurray gets shoplifter Barbara Stanwyck’s case postponed over the holiday season, then ends up bringing her back home to Indiana and his mother Beulah Bondi and aunt Elizabeth Patterson for Christmas. Preston Sturges’ last script before his writer/director debut (with The Great McGinty in 1940), and one of his warmest, if satirical, portraits of small town Americana, complete with holiday barn dance — and that stopover in Niagara Falls. Approx. 94 min. 35mm.

A  UNIVERSAL PICTURES RELEASE

REMEMBER THE NIGHT

REVIEWS

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WARM, PLEASANT AND  UNUSUALLY ENTERTAINING!  A drama stated in the simple human terms of comedy and sentiment, tenderness and generosity. Its character drawing is deft and in splendid proportion... Rarely has a theme been so smoothly advanced and so pleasantly played out to so sensible and credible a conclusion... Miss Stanwyck has played the girl with grave understanding and charm, rounding out the character rather than stamping it out by stencil.” 
– Frank Nugent, The New York Times

 “The loose, graceful script is by Preston Sturges, and it partakes of a softness and nostalgia that seldom surfaced in his own films. Leisen serves the material very well with his slightly distanced, glowing style.”
– Dave Kehr

A MOVIE OF WARMTH AND IMMENSE STYLE! A winning romantic comedy-drama from the ever-elegant Leisen, who elicits a superb performance from Stanwyck... Playing superbly on the personae of his leads, Leisen creates a movie of warmth and immense style, which never quite trips over into excessive sentimentality.” 
– Geoff Andrew, Time Out (London)

“It is acknowledged that [Stanwyck’s] character, Lee Leander, is hot, that she knows about sex, that she’s not a good girl, and yet she’s not vulgar or tainted or soiled or bitter. She is sexy and good-hearted and smart. Sturges allows her to be all of these things, and somehow it brings Barbara’s own persona together in a way that is light and appealing, buoyant and still full of substance... In the hands of Sturges and Leisen, the pace is light and up. Barbara is full of vitality and quick on her feet, and she blazes.”
– Victoria Wilson, A Life of Barbara Stanwyck:  Steel-True, 1907-1940