2 FILMS FOR 1 ADMISSION

Previously Played

  • ON THE BOWERY
    FRI 1:00 4:20 8:45
    SAT 1:00 4:20
  • THE CONNECTION
    FRI 2:20 6:45 10:10
    SAT 2:20

Tickets available at box office only

Part of the seriesNEW YAWK NEW WAVE

See the complete schedule of films

ON THE BOWERY and THE CONNECTION

ON THE BO​WERY

(1957, Lionel Rogosin) Three days in the life of Ray Salyer, fresh-faced arrival on America’s #1 Skid Row (including some of today’s SoHo), in non-scripted improv starring actual Bowery denizens. Best Documentary, Venice Film Festival and Best Documentary Oscar nom. Approx. 65 min. 35mm.
FRI 1:00, 4:20, 8:45 SAT 1:00, 4:20

“A quintessential chunk of NYC history.”
– J. Hoberman

 

“Balances gritty documentation with obviously scripted interludes, affirming that the greatest nonfiction films aren’t a question of nominal objectivity, but morality. A must-see for anyone who cherishes the old soul of New York.”
– Manohla Dargis, The New York Times

ON THE BOWERY and THE CONNECTION

THE CONNECTION

(1961, Shirley Clarke) Junkies waiting for a fix do improvs, rant to the camera, play jazz, then suggest to “documentarist” William Redfield that he might want to get high himself. Adapted from Jack Gelber’s Living Theater hit. Critics’ Prize, Cannes. Approx. 103 min. 35mm.
FRI 2:20, 6:45, 10:10 SAT 2:20

 

“A time capsule loaded with smack from the bohemian underbelly of JFK-era America, Shirley Clarke’s 1961 film The Connection is an illustration of how much things change, and how much they stay the same... Watching this ensemble drama about a multiracial group of New York jazz musicians and beat philosophers in a run-down apartment, waiting for their drug dealer to show up, is like traveling back 50 years in time, only to encounter the same people you might meet on the street today (at least, in certain neighborhoods of Brooklyn, San Francisco, Austin and so on).”
– Andrew O'Hehir, Salon

“Clarke’s decision to both literally and figuratively turn the camera on the creative types behind it was key; in many ways, The Connection sets the template for modern form-hijacking meta-movie gestures, from David Holzman’s Diary to the self-conscious indies of the ’90s. One man’s squalor is another’s mise en scène, it tells us, and anyone who thinks you can be objective with a movie camera running and a mojo pin in your arm is dreaming... Attention must be paid.”
– David Fear, Time Out New York

“Beneath the supposed meaningless of The Connection, beneath all walking, talking and jazzing, a sort of spiritual autopsy of contemporary man is performed.” 
– Jonas Mekas

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