2 FILMS FOR 1 ADMISSION

Previously Played

  • MY MAN GODFREY
  • 4:00 8:00
  • SHOW B​OAT
  • 1:50 5:50

Tickets available at box office only

Part of the seriesUNIVERSAL 100

See the complete schedule of films

MY MAN GODFREY & SHOW B​OAT

MY MAN GODFREY

(1936, Gregory La Cava) Dizzy heiress Carole Lombard wins the scavenger hunt by producing bum William Powell as a “forgotten man” — then hires him as her butler, joining a menagerie of relatives and hangers-on. Approx. 95 min. 35mm.
4:00, 8:00

 

“One of screwball’s greatest triumphs. It’s one of the few movies that you can never see too many times.”
– Time Out New York

“A seamless blend of high comedy and social consciousness.”
– Dave Kehr, The New York Times

“One of the treasures of screwball comedy. God, but this film is beautiful.
The cinematography is a shimmering argument for everything I've ever tried to say in praise of black and white.”

– Roger Ebert

“One of the richest films in the screwball tradition so closely associated with life in Depression America.” – Vincent Canby, The New York Times

“A durably clever and harmonious romantic farce whose blend of topicality, absurdity and geniality remains unrivaled.”The Washington Post

MY MAN GODFREY & SHOW B​OAT

SHOW BOAT

New 35mm Print!(1936, James Whale) The screen’s finest version of Kern & Hammerstein’s musical classic, with Irene Dunne and Allan Jones meeting and parting; Helen Morgan’s heart-wrenching torch songs; and topped by Paul Robeson’s electrifying “Ol’ Man River.” Approx. 113 min. 35mm.
1:50, 5:50

 

“Definitive. The Mississippi River setting is full of American myths, and Whale perfectly connects to the collective nostalgia—and guilt—of his adopted country. One appreciates not only the tragic grandeur Whale gives Paul Robeson's 'Ol' Man River,' but also the director's intelligence—knowing to do nothing that might break the intimate spell of Helen Morgan's tremulous, wrenching rendition of 'Bill,' one of the most perfect movie moments we have.”
– Nick Pinkerton, The Village Voice

“Masterly, with some definitive performances and an exquisite evocation of the period and the landscape,
for the first time in Whale’s work unmistakably American.”

– John Russell Taylor

“Time and again surprises with its vivacity and the equal skill out—doors and in front of backdrops.
Suggests true versatility, plus the mixture of sophistication and unashamed sentiment.”

– David Thomson

“The cast brings them to life so vividly one sometimes forgets that one is simply watching a movie.
The viewer truly comes to care for these people as old, treasured friends. Show Boat, more than any other movie musical of the 1930s, unfolds like the vision of America as seen on the pages of a well-worn family album.”

– Miles Kreuger

“Very lavish... directed with a fine moneyed smoothness... proves good entertainment, sentimental, literary, but oddly appealing.”
– Graham Greene