2 FILMS FOR 1 ADMISSION

Previously Played

  • MEAN STREETS 1:10 5:20
    WHO’S THAT KNOCKING AT MY DOOR 3:30

Tickets available at box office only

Part of the seriesNEW YAWK NEW WAVE

See the complete schedule of films

MEAN STREETS and WHO’S THAT KNOCKING AT MY DOOR

MEAN STREETS

(1973, Martin Scorsese) Guilt-ridden hood Harvey Keitel keeps a low profile, but out-of-his-friggin’-mind cousin Robert De Niro doesn’t give a flyin’ pasta fazool about those gambling debts. Plus Les Rues de Mean Streets (2010, Bruce Goldstein), a tour of Marty’s old nabe. Approx. 117 min. 35mm.
WED 1:10, 5:20, 9:30 THU 1:10, 5:20

 

"No matter how bleak the milieu, no matter how heartbreaking the narrative, some films are so thoroughly, beautifully realized they have a kind of tonic effect that has no relation to the subject matter. Such a film is Mean Streets."
– Vincent Canby, The New York Times

"The acting and editing have such an original, tumultuous force that the picture is completely gripping."
– Dave Kehr, Chicago Reader

"Scorsese directs with a breathless, head-on energy which infuses the performances, the sharp fast talk, the noise, neon and violence with a charge of adrenalin. One of the best American films of its decade."
Time Out (London)

MEAN STREETS and WHO’S THAT KNOCKING AT MY DOOR

WHO’S THAT KNOCKING AT MY DOOR

(1967, Martin Scorsese) Little Italy denizen Harvey Keitel divides women into “nice girls” and “broads,” but then must face the fact that the classy college girl he’s been shyly romancing is no virgin. Approx. 90 min. 35mm.
WED 3:30, 7:40 THU 3:30

 

"The first two scenes - pasta and saints in the kitchen, street gel heads bashing skulls to a doo-wop tune - lay out the Gospel According to Martin Scorsese. Film as sacrament, musical spectacle, lavish delectation of image and sound."
– Fernando Croce

"There's no doubting the talent. In the aggressive self-confidence, the use of rock music, and the perceptive observation, Scorsese reveals an anthropological feel for street life and the attitudes of male adolescence, particularly how introversion and weakness are reserved for moments with the opposite sex, kept carefully apart from the mainstream of life."
Time Out (London)

“A great moment in American movies.”
– Roger Ebert (1967 review)