Previously Played

LAST YEAR AT MARIENBAD

  • 8:20

$7 Member   $12.50 Regular

Introduced by J. Hoberman

LAST YEAR AT MARIENBAD

(1961, Alain Resnais) As ominous organ music resounds, the Scope camera tracks through the seemingly endless halls of a baroque grand hotel — as Giorgio Albertazzi tries to persuade an initially disbelieving Delphine Seyrig that they’d met the year before... With dizzying time shifts and flashbacks, real or imagined, Marienbad is considered the ultimate puzzle film. Winner, Golden Lion, Venice Film Festival. Approx. 94 min. 35mm.

This is our third event celebrating the 50th anniversary of the New York Review of Books; the NYRB Classics edition of The Invention of Morel by Adolfo Bioy Casares, inspiration for Alain Robbe-Grillet’s Oscar-nominated screenplay, will be on sale at our concession tonight. Introduced by critic and NYRB contributor J. Hoberman.

LAST YEAR AT MARIENBAD

LAST YEAR AT MARIENBAD

REVIEWS

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“A GORGEOUS PUZZLE BOX OF A MOVIE! To revisit Marienbad today is to glimpse a vanished moment when American audiences drank in European films not because they were universal or 'relatable,' but for their otherness, their impenetrability, their definite contrast to the simplistic and elephantine Technicolor epics that much of Hollywood was then embracing… Manhattan cinephiles may find themselves as mystified and delighted as their counterparts in 1962."

– Mark Harris, The New York Times

Last Year at Marienbad recalls not just a style of filmmaking—glacial, intense, contemptuous of easy explanations—but a whole epoch of filmgoing, in which the burdens of European cinema were loaded into late-night discussion… Seeing the film again, and succumbing, like a dance partner, to its gliding moves, one has to ask: how could a film this beautiful ever have been thought unapproachable?”
– Anthony Lane, The New Yorker

"Hopelessly retro, eternally avant-garde, and one of the most influential movies ever made (as well as one of the most reviled), Marienbad is both utterly lucid and provocatively opaque… It eludes tense. The movie is what it is—a sustained mood, an empty allegory, a choreographed moment outside of time, and a shocking intimation of perfection."

– J. Hoberman, The Village Voice

Trailer

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