Final Day! Thursday, August 8

LA BEAUTÉ DU DIABLE

  • 1:00
  • 6:15

$7 Member   $12.50 Regular

Directed by RENÉ CLAIR

Starring MICHEL SIMON and GÉRARD PHILIPE

NEW RESTORATION

LA BEAUTÉ DU DIABLE

(1950) When Gérard Philipe’s “second rate devil” Mephistopheles makes that famous pact with Michel Simon’s forlorn alchemist Faust — one soul in return for sex, power, and youth, not to mention the secrets of the universe — the two exchange bodies, with the ancient Faust transformed into the handsome, dashing young Philipe, and vice versa. But then Philipe/Faust gets a peek at the post-atomic horrors to come… Approx. 95 min. DCP.

 A COHEN FILM COLLECTION RELEASE

LA BEAUTÉ DU DIABLE

REVIEWS

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****! [4 STARS!] CRITICS’ PICK!
"FASCINATING! A forgotten 1950s fantasy...For all of the movie's visual gorgeousness, it stands as perhaps the most philosophical and the most modern of all Faust films. Moral issues of desire and happiness are twisted into knots. ESSENTIAL MOVIENESS! "

– Michael Atkinson, Time Out New York

“ONE OF THE GREAT FILMS!”
– New York Herald Tribune

“The dangers of science and of absolute power are the targets, and the fantasy is urbane.”
– Pauline Kael

“A venerable story re-told, but it is philosophy for sophisticates presented with vitality and movement… In Michel Simon, M. Clair has the consummate thespian… at once a fearsome, impish and, at times, jolly devil. His characterization is broad enough for him to bellow in stentorian tones for help from Lucifer. At other times, he is the sly schemer who is not averse to ogling the ladies and guzzling more than his share of the wine. He is, in short, both a bearded Mephisto — sometimes happy, sometimes frustrated, and sometimes frightening — and a bumbling, confused and aged Faust groping for time to finish his research. Gérard Philipe as the youthful Faust (as well as a reincarnation of the devil) gives the role a wistful, tender and, at times, gay reading.”
– A.H. Weiler, The New York Times

“As with so many men before him, Clair let the devil steal his show. Simon’s portrait of the aging Faust, muttering absentmindedly while the learned do him honor, is precise and human, and in the role of Mephistopheles — who, of course, assumes Faust’s aging body when giving Faust the form of the young man — he is brilliant, sardonic, and devilishly charming… It is one of the finest films 
I have seen.”
– Paul V. Beckley, New York Herald Tribune

Trailer

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