2 FILMS FOR 1 ADMISSION

Previously Played

  • KILLER’S KISS
  • 3:10 6:50 10:30
  • SOMETHING WILD
  • 1:00 4:40 8:20

Tickets available at box office only

Part of the seriesNEW YAWK NEW WAVE

See the complete schedule of films

KILLER’S KISS and SOMETHING WILD

KILLER’S KISS

(1955, Stanley Kubrick) Jamie Smith falls hard for Pleasureland hostess Irene Kane (aka author/critic Chris Chase), but club boss Frank Silvera has his own plans. Arms, heads, and legs go flying in the axeswinging mannequin factory showdown. Approx. 67 min. 35mm.
FRI 3:20, 9:10 SAT 3:10, 6:50, 10:30

“For anyone who wants to get a flavor of mid-50s Times Square.”
– William Grimes, The New York Times

 

“A noirish thriller with experimental trimmings”
– Jonathan Rosenbaum, Chicago Reader

“Using Times Square and even the subway as his backdrop, Mr. Kubrick worked in an uncharacteristically naturalistic style, with fascinating results.”
– Janet Maslin, The New York Times

KILLER’S KISS and SOMETHING WILD

SOMETHING WILD

(1961, Jack Garfein) Co-ed Carroll Baker escapes to the LES following a brutal rape in the park. Will similarly lostsoul/ garage mechanic Ralph Meeker (Kiss Me Deadly) prove savior or ...? Sizzling NYC summer shot by the great Eugene Schüfttan, with Aaron Copland score. Approx. 112 min. 35mm.
FRI 1:10, 4:50 SAT 1:00, 4:40, 8:20

“Marvelously strange. Less a crime drama or even a story of psychological trauma than a philosophical inquiry into the state of the modern urban soul.”
– A.O. Scott, The New York Times

“UNFORGETTABLE! Beautiful, sad, confusingly romantic and richly empathetic. An expressionistic/naturalistic work of art that also recalls Roman Polanski’s Repulsion, before Polanski’s film was made, and Bergman, was far ahead of its time in its European sensibilties(and yet, with its actors and setting, it feels wholly American).”
– Kim Morgan

“A narrative precursor to Roman Polanski’s Repulsion. The opening title sequence by Saul Bass is a perverse explosion of geometric images and graphic matches that announces the hustle–and–bustle of a scorching New York City day, the sun hanging from the sky like a sunnyside–up egg. This inspired madness carries over to much of the film, which tiptoes alongside its main character as if afraid of the dark.”
– Ed Gonzalez, Slant Magazine

“Shooting on location in a Harlem five–and–dime, an actual flophouse doubtless now the site of a luxury coop, the Williamsburg Bridge, and in the Lower East Side, Mr. Garfein and his cinematographer, Eugen Schüfftan (colenser of Fritz Lang's Metropolis), inadvertently created a time capsule of a late 1950s New York that no longer exists outside of Weegee photographs and other forgotten films.”
– New York Sun