2 FILMS FOR 1 ADMISSION

Previously Played

  • DINNER AT EIGHT
    3:20 7:30
    DESIGN FOR LIVING
    1:20 5:30 9:40

Tickets available at box office only

DINNER AT EIGHT and DESIGN FOR LIVING

DINNER AT EIGHT

(George Cukor) "I was reading a book the other day..." The Ultimate Guest List cross-sections New York's social strata: John and Lionel Barrymore, Wallace Beery, Billie Burke, Lee Tracy with Jean Harlow and Marie Dressler bringing the house down with their closing lines. Donald Ogden Stewart and Herman Mankiewicz’s screenplay actually improves the original stage hit by their Algonquin tablemates Kaufman & Ferber. Approx. 91 min. 35mm.
3:20, 7:30

 

“A near-flawless comedy/drama with an all-star cast at the peak of their talents.”
– Mordaunt Hall, The New York Times

“A bright and witty comedy… Glitters on the strength of its director’s superb assessment of his players’ abilities.”
– Dave Kehr, Chicago Reader

"Reveals the plummy and emphatic mid-Atlantic accents of the many stage-trained Hollywood actors of the time. The startling exception is Jean Harlow, as a trophy wife who snarls at her maid and lies around in bed all day waiting for her doctor lover to show up. It's one of the comic glories of her brief career. But the others, in their florid style, also have extraordinary moments, as Cukor lets them loose in long monologues shot in stunningly lit closeups. John Barrymore is especially moving as an eerily accurate version of himself—an alcoholic, washed-up star."
– David Denby, The New Yorker

DINNER AT EIGHT and DESIGN FOR LIVING

DESIGN FOR LIVING

(Ernst Lubitsch) Ménage à trois à Paris, as commercial artist Miriam Hopkins shacks up with both struggling playwright Frederic March and undiscovered painter Gary Cooper. Noel Coward was reportedly delighted with Ben Hecht’s adaptation, though the latter chortled that he left only two lines of the original. Plus Maurice Chevalier and Jeanette MacDonald in an episode of Hollywood on Parade. Approx. 91 min. 35mm.
1:20, 5:30, 9:40

 

Design for Living is what sexy should be – delightful, romantic, agonizing ecstasy. And it’s not just sexy but also revolutionary, daring, sweet, sour, cynical, carefree, poignant, and so far ahead of its time that one could cite it as not only a pre-Code masterpiece but also a prefeminist testimonial. A uniquely Lubitschian picture in its elegance and graceful wisdom… What film, even before [the Breen Code], has ever presented the potentially salacious scenario of three-way love in such a wistfully complicated way?”
– Kim Morgan, Criterion Collection