2 FILMS FOR 1 ADMISSION

Previously Played

  • CHAFED ELBOWS
  • 3:20 6:30
  • PUTNEY SWOPE
  • 1:00 4:40 7:50

Tickets available at box office only

Part of the seriesNEW YAWK NEW WAVE

See the complete schedule of films

CHAFED ELBOWS and PUTNEY SWOPE

CHAFED ELBOWS

Restored by Anthology Film Archives with funding provided by The Film Foundation

(1966, Robert Downey) George Morgan’s breakdown at the World’s Fair includes mother love, a cop impersonation, a trip to heaven, and becoming a rock band singer. The Underground’s first real smash hit. Approx. 63 min. 35mm.
3:20, 6:30

 

"Suggests a funky La Jetée or a precursor of National Lampoon's Foto Funnies. Downey Sr. upped the acidity and narrowed the focus by having his barefoot antihero Walter Dinsmore (George Morgan) crawl out of an incestuous bed with his mother (the director's wife Elsie, playing all the female roles) to wander Gotham, encountering and competing with a city full of aggressive crazies. Absurdism reigns!"
–  Bill Weber, Slant Magazine

CHAFED ELBOWS and PUTNEY SWOPE

PUTNEY SWOPE

(1969, Robert Downey) It’s time to bring in the soul brothers when African American Arnold Johnson becomes an ad agency head after everybody gives him that token vote, and the vicious commercial parodies keep on coming, with Face-off Pimple Cream a stand-out. Approx. 84 min. 35mm.
1:00,4:40, 7:50

 

"Uses the most mercenary of white-collar professions as a metaphor for racial tension (and African American infighting) in the societal cauldron of 1969. Significantly altered Downey Sr.'s career when it was picked up by a national distributor and was a sleeper hit, becoming a totemic satire of its era."
– Bill Weber, Slant Magazine

"The determined goofiness of some of the conceits (e.g., German midgets Pepi and Ruth Hermine as the U.S. president and first lady) and the interspersed parodic TV commercials (all of them in color, though the rest of the movie is in black and white) give one a better idea of the jaunty excesses of the late 60s than Hollywood movies of the same period."
– Jonathan Rosenbaum, Chicago Reader